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KIS – short for KEEP IT SIMPLE!

KIS Migration, a Canadian immigration consultancy, offers a multi-lingual full range of Canadian immigration consulting services. Our business model of Keeping It Simple is key to success. Everyone’s path to Canada is unique! We assist you on your journey to Canada while making the process easy for you. Let us help you realize your Canadian dream!

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Know your options! So you can get the support you need, when you need it. The best place to start is by completing our free and fast online eligibility questionnaire.

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We focus on providing transparent immigration consulting services via online access.
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Why should you work with a Canadian immigration consultant? Convenience, peace of mind, transparency or reduction of risk potential. The truth is that most customers need a strategy to reach their ultimate dream of Canadian permanent resident or citizenship status. In addition, Canadian immigration laws, regulations and policies are changing constantly. KIS Migration can help you or quickly point you in the right direction.

Our Canadian Immigration Consulting Services

The value of our diverse experience to you lies in the range of services we provide.
  • What is Canadian temporary resident status?

    Canadian temporary resident status

    Explore Canada! – Canada’s vision of a free, safe and prosperous country draws migrants from all corners of the world.

    What is Canadian temporary resident status?

    Foreigners who have Canadian temporary resident status are allowed to visit, work or study in Canada for a limited amount of time. To obtain and maintain Canadian temporary resident status, foreigners must meet the legal requirements to enter and remain in Canada as a visitor, student, worker or temporary resident permit holder.

    After an application for Canadian temporary resident status was submitted to an Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada (IRCC) office, the visa officer will decide whether to approve the request and the border officer will determine whether to admit the foreigner on a temporary basis while imposing various terms (e.g. length of stay). Furthermore, temporary residents must comply with general conditions (e.g. to leave Canada by the end of authorized stay; not to study or work without permission, etc.).

    According to demand, IRCC processes temporary resident applications under the following categories:

    Temporary resident visas

    Foreigners from visa-required countries who seek to visit Canada, may apply for a temporary resident visa (TRV) to enter and stay in Canada for up to six months. In contrast, a super visa allows parents and grandparents to join their children and grandchildren in Canada for up to two years. Generally, visitors are not allowed to work, but may study, if the duration of the program is six months or less.

    Foreigners from visa-required countries must have a valid passport and a TRV to be permitted to enter and re-enter Canada. A TRV is a counterfoil (sticker) issued by a visa officer that is placed in the passport to indicate that the holder may become a temporary resident on admission to Canada.

    As noted, a TRV does not guarantee admission to Canada. However, it permits a foreigner to travel to a Canadian port of entry (POE) by air, sea or land; to request admission to Canada. Finally, a border officer will decide whether to grant entry.

    Electronic travel authorizations

    Foreigners from visa-exempt countries must obtain electronic travel authorizations (eTA), if they want to fly to or transit through Canada by air.

    Applying for an eTA is an inexpensive online process (C$7 per person). Generally, eTA approvals are sent via email within minutes and are valid for five years.

    Study Permits

    Foreigners who wish to study in Canada for more than six months, may apply for a study permit (SP). If granted, the SP will be valid for the duration of the period of study, generally up to four years. Full time students may work part time during their studies.

    Work Permits

    Generally, foreigners who want to work in Canada, need to obtain a work permit (WP). The duration of a WP will be tied to the length of the contract offered by the Canadian employer, usually one or two years.

    Changes, extensions and loss

    Generally, a visitor cannot be granted an initial WP or SP from an IRCC office within Canada. If approved, the applicant must leave Canada and re-enter to receive a permit at the POE. Sometimes; however, temporary residents may change the category from within Canada.

    Temporary resident status may be extended by written request. For example, visitors may apply to IRCC to extend their stay in Canada. If approved, a visitor record (VR) with a new expiry date will be issued.

    As long as the renewal application was submitted before the expiry date, the temporary resident will benefit from implied status. Temporary residents under implied status may remain in Canada under the same conditions until a decision is made.

    When temporary residents have overstayed, they may be eligible to apply for restoration of status within 90 days of loss, as long as, they continue to comply with the initial conditions. Otherwise they must depart Canada.

    Temporary resident permits

    Inadmissible foreigners need special permission to enter or remain in Canada. A temporary resident permit (TRP) is only granted in extraordinary cases. To overcome inadmissibility, the officer must be convinced that the reasons for allowing to enter and stay in Canada outweigh any health and safety risks to Canadian society.

    Canadian temporary resident status
    What is Canadian temporary resident status?
    Temporary Residence
  • What is Canadian permanent resident status?

    Canadian permanent resident status

    Your Forever Home Canada! – Canada’s vision of a free, safe and prosperous country draws immigrants from all corners of the world.

    On October 31th, 2016, the Government of Canada introduced its bold immigration policy by increasing the target from 250,000 to 300,000 immigrants in 2017 – primarily, through economic immigration and family reunification to attract newcomers who can contribute to Canada’s population and economic growth. The benefits of immigration lie in balancing the effects of a greying nation while strengthening Canada’s economy.

    What is Canadian permanent resident status?

    Foreigners who have Canadian permanent resident status are allowed to make Canada their home. Permanent residents may live, work and study in Canada as long as they keep their status. To obtain and maintain Canadian permanent resident status, foreigners must meet the legal requirements to enter and remain in Canada as permanent residents.

    After an application for Canadian permanent resident status was submitted to an Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada (IRCC) office, the visa and immigration officers will decide whether to approve the request and the border officer will determine whether to admit the foreigner on a permanent basis. Furthermore, permanent residents must comply with the residency obligation (e.g. physical presence in Canada for a minimum of 730 days in a five-year period, etc.).

    According to annual caps (2017 – 2020: 300,000 to 340,000 immigrants per year), IRCC processes permanent resident applications under the following classes:

    • Family Classes (Family and Spousal Sponsorship)
    • Economic Classes (Express Entry: Skilled Worker, Trade, Canadian Experience; Provincial Nominee and Business Immigrant)
    • Refugee and Humanitarian and Compassionate Considerations Classes
    • Temporary Resident Permit Holder Class

    Permanent resident visas

    Foreigners who intend to move to Canada, may apply for a permanent resident visa (PRV) to live in Canada. Permanent residents enjoy social benefits similar to Canadian citizens; however, they are not allowed to vote, hold a Canadian passport, hold a position requiring a high-level security clearance or run for elected office: these rights are reserved for Canadian citizens.

    Foreigners from visa-required countries must have a valid passport and a PRV to be permitted to enter and stay in Canada. A PRV is a counterfoil (sticker) issued by a visa or immigration officer that is placed in the passport to indicate that the holder may become a permanent resident on admission to Canada.

    Foreigner from visa-exempt countries must have a valid passport and a Confirmation of Permanent Residence (COPR) to be admitted to Canada. A COPR is a white, legal size document issued by a visa or immigration officer.

    As noted, a PRV/COPR does not guarantee admission to Canada. However, it permits a foreigner to travel to a Canadian port of entry (POE) by air, sea or land; to request admission to Canada. Finally, a border officer will decide whether to grant entry by reviewing new facts (e.g. criminal charges, marriages, birth of a child).

    Permanent Resident Card

    After landing, IRCC will mail the permanent resident card (PRC) to the newcomer’s home address within three months. The PRC is a wallet-sized, plastic card and used as a status and travel document. It is best practice to renew the PRC every five years.

    Loss of Permanent Resident Status

    When permanent residents do not fulfill their residency obligation, they loose their status; must leave Canada.

    Grounds of inadmissibility may also lead to loss of permanent residence.

    Permanent residents who no longer wish to reside in Canada may give up their permanent resident status.

    Canadian permanent resident status
    What is Canadian permanent resident status?
    Permanent Residence
  • How to obtain Canadian citizenship?

    Canadian citizenship

    Canada adopted three methods to confer Canadian citizenship: ius soli (citizenship by place of birth), ius sanguinis (citizenship by bloodline) and naturalization (citizenship by law).

    Acquisition of Canadian citizenship

    Generally, a person may acquire Canadian citizenship by:

    1. birth in Canada,
    2. birth outside Canada to a Canadian, or
    3. grant.

    Proof of Canadian citizenship

    In case of status uncertainty, the individual should complete Immigration Refugees and Citizenship Canada’s Am I Canadian? questionnaire. To ensure that the prospect is a Canadian, the person should apply for a citizenship certificate (proof of citizenship).

    Grant of Canadian citizenship

    Canadian citizenship is granted to permanent residents, after they fulfilled the requirements established by the Citizenship Act.

    If adults (at least 18 years old) want to apply for a grant of citizenship, they must have permanent resident status in Canada. Further, adults must have been physically present in Canada for at least 1095 days (three years) out of the last five years before the application.

    When assessing whether the applicant meets the residency requirement, keep in mind the following four rules:

    1. Every day of physical presence as a permanent resident counts as one day.
    2. Every day of residency as a temporary resident or protected person computed as a half day; accumulating to a maximum of 365 days.
    3. Time spent serving a sentence or under a probation order in Canada is not considered.
    4. Furthermore, government employees and their family members may use time spent outside Canada.

    Tips

    To calculate the physical presence in Canada, the prospects should record their trips outside Canada in a travel journal.

    Best practice is to apply with more than 1095 days of physical presence to avoid any problems with the calculation.

    Last but not least, applicants between the ages of 18 and 54 must demonstrate sufficient knowledge in English or French, pass the citizenship test and take the citizenship oath.

    Loss of Canadian citizenship

    Canadian citizenship may be lost only for two reasons: renunciation and revocation.

    Renunciation

    If Canadians give up (renounce) their citizenship, they must apply to terminate citizenship. After a senior citizenship judge granted the requests to renounce citizenship, the applicants lose their rights (right to enter/remain, vote and hold public office in Canada) and privileges (issuance of a passport) as Canadians. Consequently, they will not have status in Canada any longer. 

    Revocation

    The Minister of Citizenship and Immigration (Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada) may remove (revoke) citizenship as long as the person will not be rendered stateless, for the following two reasons: fraud or misrepresentation. The waiting period for re-applying for citizenship is ten years.

    Multiple Citizenships

    Since 1977 Canada allows multiple citizenships (dual citizenship). Hence, permanent residents are permitted to become Canadians while retaining their previous nationality.

    Specimen

    Follow the link to see examples of Canadian citizenship certificates.

    Federal Court

    If the individuals are not satisfied with the decision of the Immigration Refugees and Citizenship Canada (citizenship officers) or the Citizenship Commission (citizenship judges), they may apply to the Federal Court for leave and judicial review as a self-represented litigant or with the assistance of a lawyer.

    Canadian citizenship
    How to obtain Canadian citizenship?
    Citizenship
  • How to Appeal Canadian Immigration Decisions?

    appeal immigration decisions

    Presently, the right to appeal Canadian immigration decisions is not available in all cases. 

    Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada

    The Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada (IRB) is an independent administrative tribunal that makes decisions on immigration and refugee matters in Canada. It consists of four divisions:

    1. Immigration Division (ID),
    2. Immigration Appeal Division (IAD),
    3. Refugee Protection Division (RPD), and
    4. Refugee Appeal Division (RAD).

    Hearings

    The Immigration Division holds admissibility hearings and detention reviews for people who are facing removal from Canada. 

    Admissibility Hearing – Detention Review

    The member (decision-maker) of the Immigration Division conducts hearings regarding admissibility of permanent residents and foreigners, and review of immigration detentions.

    The Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness is represented by a hearings officer who will present the case pro removal, detention or inadmissibility. The individual may self-represent or retain an immigration professional (lawyer, Canadian immigration consultant, paralegal in Ontario and notary in Quebec) to assist with the proceeding.

    Appeals

    The Immigration Appeal Division hears four types of immigration appeals:

    1. family class sponsorship,
    2. removal order,
    3. residency obligation, and
    4. appeals by the Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness.

    Sponsorship Appeal

    A permanent resident or Canadian citizen whose application to sponsor a family member to Canada was refused by Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada (IRCC) may appeal to the Immigration Appeal Division.

    Removal Order Appeal

    Permanent resident visa holders, permanent residents, refugees or protected persons, who have received a removal order, may lodge a removal order appeal.

    Residency Obligation Appeal

    Permanent residents who have been found by a Canadian visa office that they did not meet their residency obligation, may make a residency obligation appeal (loss-of-permanent-residence appeal).

    Minister’s Appeal

    The Minister of Public Safety represented by a hearings officer may appeal to the Immigration Appeal Division against a decision made by the Immigration Division at an admissibility hearing holding that the individual may remain in Canada.

    The appeal process begins with filing the Notice of Appeal (form) at the Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada registry within the time limit. The appellants have the right to be represented by counsel (lawyer, Canadian immigration consultant, paralegal in Ontario and notary in Quebec) at their own expense. Further, they have the right to an interpreter and may call witnesses to support their case.

    Federal Court

    If the individuals are not satisfied with the decision of the Immigration Appeal Division, they may apply to the Federal Court for leave and judicial review as a self-represented litigant or with the assistance of a lawyer.

    Overcoming Inadmissibility

    Generally, foreigners, temporary residents and permanent residents can be found inadmissible to Canada. Hence, the inadmissible person is not allowed to enter and / or remain in Canada.

    Rehabilitation

    The individual must apply for rehabilitation to overcome criminal inadmissibility with respect to offences committed outside Canada. To be exempted, the person must show that at least five years have passed since the completion of the sentence (imprisonment, fine, probation, etc.).

    Temporary Resident Permit

    Otherwise the individual may request a temporary resident permit (TRP) before entry to Canada. A temporary resident permit (minister’s permit) is only issued in extraordinary circumstances.

    Authorization to Return to Canada

    During the inadmissibility assessment one of the three following types of removal orders may be issued:

    1. departure order,
    2. exclusion order, and
    3. deportation order.

    Departure Order

    The individual must leave Canada within 30 days after the departure order has been enforced. Upon re-entry an authorization to return to Canada (ARC) is not needed. If the person did not leave on time, the departure order turns into a deportation order.

    Exclusion Order

    The person is barred from entering Canada for one year and needs a written authorization to return to Canada within the one-year period. In misrepresentation cases, one is not allowed to return to Canada within five years, unless authorized in writing.

    Deportation Order

    One is barred for life, unless authorized to return to Canada.

    appeal immigration decisions
    How to Appeal Canadian Immigration Decisions?
    Enforcement and Appeal
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About Our Canadian Immigration Consultancy

What we do and how we got here.
Canadian Immigration and Citizenship Consulting Services

Our history is a true love story. I fell in love with Simion, who was a migrant in Montreal, Quebec. To help my husband, I managed his migration, immigration, enforcement and citizenship cases. Finally, I obtained his Canadian citizenship status as an immigration consultant. In 2016, we started KIS Migration, a Canadian immigration consultancy. Since then we helped many people on their journey to Canada. We consider helping others a noble cause and our passion in our work shows. We offer a full range of Canadian immigration consulting services in five languages: English, French, German, Romanian and Hebrew. Our business model of Keeping It Simple is key to success. Everyone's path to Canada is unique! We assist you on your journey to Canada while making the process easy for you. Let us help you realize your Canadian dream!

  • Temporary Residence

    Visitor - Student - Worker - TR Permit

  • Permanent Residence

    Economic Classes: Express Entry / Skilled Worker / Trade / CEC / Provincial Nominee / Business Immigrant - Family Classes - H&C Consideration - TR Permit Holder - Loss

  • Citizenship

    Grant - Proof - Acquisition - Loss

  • Enforcement and Appeal

    Hearings: Admissibility / Detention Review - Removal - Appeals: Sponsorship / Removal Order / Residency Obligation / Minister's - Inadmissibility: ARC - Rehabilitation - TRP

Our Canadian Immigration Consultancy Team

A Family-Run Business
Katharina Kontaxis
Katharina Kontaxis
Impresario
Immigration & Citizenship Consultant ICCRC ID No.: R512662, 2015-Present CAPIC ID No.: R15819, 2015-Present CSIC, CA – Immigration Law 2014 University of Vienna, AT – Law 2001 Languages: English, French and German Visited Canada in 1999 and immigrated to Canada in 2001.
Simion Babenco
Simion Babenco
Liaison Officer
Responsible Person (ICCRC-CRCIC) Sales, Marketing & Communications AIT, CA – Security Professional 2015 Languages: English, Romanian, Hebrew Visited Canada in 2010 and immigrated to Canada in 2014.

KIS Migration helps people from around the world while being sensitive to their time zones. Correspondence by email is the best option to reach us. Please contact KIS Migration either in person, by phone, by email or via Skype / Zoom. Office Hours: Monday through Thursday 9:00 – 17:00 Mountain Time Zone. **** BY APPOINTMENT ONLY ****

Our Immigration Consultancy Fees

The professional fees listed below do not include government fees or out-of-pocket expenses.

hourly rate

+ 5% GST

C$150

/30 minutes
  • Consultation
  • Review
  • Research
  • Report
Free Assessment

flat rate

+ 5% GST

C$3,500-7,000

  • Permanent Residence
  • Economic Classes
  • Family Classes
  • Other
Free Assessment

flat rate

+ 5% GST

c$2,500-5,000

  • Citizenship
  • Grant
  • Residency Questionnaire
  • Other
Free Assessment

flat rate

+ 5% GST

C$2,500-5,500

  • Enforcement and Appeal
  • Inadmissibility
  • Hearing
  • Appeal
Free Assessment

Our Canadian Immigration Consultancy Testimonials

What we stand for and what our customers are saying.

Get in Touch With Our Canadian Immigration Consultant

We would be happy to help you reach your immigration and citizenship goals.

Our Canadian Immigration Blog

The latest about Canadian immigration and citizenship news.

KIS Migration helps people from around the world while being sensitive to their time zones. Correspondence by email is the best option to reach us. Please contact KIS Migration either in person, by phone, by email or via Skype / Zoom. Office Hours: Monday through Thursday 9:00 – 17:00 Mountain Time Zone. **** BY APPOINTMENT ONLY ****

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